The abstracts are published in English for the workshops that will be in English and in Italian for the workshops that will be in Italian.

Opening session - 31-03-2017 - Afternoon

  • Biography

    Roberto Ruffino è Segretario Generale della Fondazione Intercultura. 

    Torinese, classe 1940, laureato in filosofia, Ruffino è uno dei maggiori esperti europei nel settore della comunicazione interculturale e dell’educazione internazionale. Il 21 Aprile 2008 ha ricevuto la Laurea Honoris Causa in Scienze dell'Educazione dall'Università di Padova, per gli oltre 40 anni di attività dedicati alla formazione interculturale. 

    Ruffino è considerato a livello internazionale tra i fondatori del filone culturale e scientifico dello scambio giovanile come occasione di formazione interculturale e di educazione alla mondialità. Collabora con diverse organizzazioni internazionali tra cui l'EFIL (la Federazione Europea per l'Apprendimento Interculturale) di cui è presidente onorario,  la SIETAR (Society for Intercultural Education, Training and Research), e il Consiglio d'Europa. 

    All'Unione Europea ha presieduto la commissione di lavoro che nel 1976-78 portò alla creazione degli "scambi di giovani lavoratori" ed ha fatto parte del Comitato Scientifico del primo progetto pilota di scambi interculturali europei per studenti liceali (2007/2008) “Mobilità studentesca Individuale – Comenius”.


Key note speaker - 31-03-2017 - Afternoon

  • Biography

    Diane L. Moore is the director of the Religious Literacy Project and a Senior Scholar at the Center for the Study of World Religions. She focuses her research on enhancing the public understanding of religion through education from the lens of critical theory.

    She is currently serving as the Principal Investigator for two initiatives: the Religious Literacy and the Professions Symposium Series, and the Religious Literacy and Humanitarian Action Research Project in partnership with Oxfam and funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. She is also serving on a task force at the US State Department in the Office of Religion and Global Affairs to enhance training about religion for Foreign Service officers and other State Department personnel.

    Moore is the lead scholar for the six module, Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) through HarvardX entitled World Religions Through Their Scriptures and the professor for the first module in the series entitled Religious Literacy: Traditions and Scriptures. The first version of the course launched in 2016 and a second version will be launched in 2017 with an added module on Sikhism.

    Regarding her work in education and with educators, Moore chaired the American Academy of Religion's Task Force on Religion in the Schools, which conducted a three-year initiative to establish guidelines for teaching about religion in K-12 public schools (PDF) that were published in 2010. She is currently serving as co-chair along with Eugene Gallagher of a three-year initiative of the American Academy of Religion to establish guidelines for what graduates of two- and four-year degree programs in the US should know about religion. She is the coordinator for the Religious Studies and Education Certificate, and her book Overcoming Religious Illiteracy: A Cultural Studies Approach to the Study of Religion in Secondary Education was published by Palgrave in 2007. She serves on the editorial boards of the journals Religion and Education and the British Journal of Religious Education.

    In 2014 she received the Petra Shattuck Excellence in Teaching Award from the Harvard Extension School and the Griffiths award from the Connecticut Council for Interfaith Understanding for her work promoting the public understanding of religion. In 2005–06 she was one of two professors chosen by Harvard Divinity School students as HDS Outstanding Teacher of the Year. Moore was also on the faculty at Phillips Andover Academy in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies until 2013. She is an ordained minister in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).


    Abstract

    Religions have functioned throughout human history to inspire the full range of agency from the heinous acts of cruelty and violence to inspired acts of justice and compassion.  This remains true in the 21st century in spite of modern predictions that religious influences would steadily decline in concert with the rise of secular democracies and advances in science.  Understanding these complex religious influences is a critical dimension of understanding modern human affairs across the full spectrum of endeavors in local, national, and global arenas.  In this presentation, I will 1) introduce a framework for enhancing religious literacy in our present context of widespread fear, mistrust, and/or misrepresentation of religion, and 2) make a case for how better literacy about religion can enhance civic imagination and help to restore a robust and sustainable demos.   

Panel: "Religious cultures and difficulties in the dialogue about sacre" - 31-03-2017 - Afternoon

  • Biography

    I am currently Chair of the Standing Advisory Council for Religious Education (SACRE) in Bradford. This body is responsible for Religious Education and Collective Worship in community schools throughout Bradford District.

    I was a secondary school teacher for 20 years in multicultural and multifaith communities. I have also held high level School Improvement posts in three local authorities and my specialist roles have included equalities, community cohesion and teaching of English to speakers of other languages. From 1997 to 2013, I was a regular contributor to and associate editor of Race Equality Teaching, a UK-based journal with an international readership.

    I hold a degree in English and American Literature from Warwick University and a Master’s degree in Urban Education from King’s College, London.

    I live in Saltaire, a World Heritage site within Bradford District and I am Chair of the Board which runs the annual arts festival in that area. 


    Abstract

    Religious education in England and Wales is currently the subject of much philosophical and political debate. Bradford is a diverse educational district with representation of all six major world faiths and other world views and religion is high profile across communities. In this context, Bradford SACRE completely re-wrote its syllabus for Religious Education over the academic year 2015-16 and this is now being used in schools.  I will explain the Bradford context and discuss the national and local challenges for Bradford in deriving the syllabus and in agreeing its emphasis with religious communities.

  • Biography

    Giovanna Barzanò è un ispettore della Direzione Generale per gli Ordinamenti Scolastici e la Valutazione , del Ministero della Istruzione Università e Ricerca, l'Italia e Honoray Senior Research Associate Onorario all' UCL Institute of Education di Londra. Un ex insegnante di scuola primaria e preside, è stata rappresentante italiano nel progetto OCSE-INES (NW C) per dieci anni e ha coordinato e partecipato a diversi progetti di cooperazione Europea su temi come la leadership educativa, la cittadinanza attiva e la voce della pupilla, l'educazione interculturale. Dal 2011 coordinatore scientifico di Rete Dialogues, un progetto di sviluppo professionale nazionale sul dialogo interculturale e interreligioso, che coinvolge circa 30 scuole in diverse regioni italiane. Ha ha pubblicato saggi e articoli in Italia e all'estero.


  • Biography

    Dr. Ekaterina Teryukova is currently an Associate Professor for Religious Studies at the Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, and the Deputy-Director for Research Affairs in the State Museum of the History of Religion, Saint-Petersburg, Russia. Born in Saint-Petersburg, Dr. Teryukova was graduated in the Chair of the History of Art at the Saint-Petersburg State University. Gained her Dh.D. (Philosophy) in  2001 in the same University.


    Abstract

    Religious artifacts being in a temple or sanctuary are included in a specific religious context, which has anthropological, cultural, historical and psychological elements. Its meaning is revealed only in the unity of the components associated with the peculiarities of beliefs and practices of a religion. In transferring these artifacts into museum space, the semantic and axiological reorientation of senses and meanings, which are associated with them, appears. The sacred object represented in secular museum sphere, thus gives the opportunity to see it from different perspective. The museum as a public neutral place, where people of every background and identity may meet, gives the floor to discuss religion. Presenting religious artifacts, some museums offer the visitors not only a possibility to see the variety of the cultural heritage of world religions, but also to make step forward into the understanding of the role of religion in history and modern situation. It is important for the museum visitors, especially for school-children and students not only to contemplate, but also to get some new knowledge, experience and skills.

Session 1 - The cultural dimention of religions - 01-04-2017 - Morning

  • Biography

    Eva Lapiedra is a lecturer and coordinator of the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Alicante University. She has dedicated several research papers to analysing terminology in historiographical discourse and its translation, particularly with regard to relations between Muslims and Christians in al-Andalus and the Maghreb. She has also investigated the transmission of historical-literary themes from Arabic-Islamic culture to Hispanic kingdoms on the Iberian Peninsula, along with the issues of slavery and piracy. In recent years, she has taken an interest in feminism in the Arabic world, and she is currently working on the themes of privacy and intimacy in Islam.

    Her publications include Cómo los musulmanes llamaban a los cristianos hispánicos (The names Muslims gave to Hispanic Christians), Alicante, 1997, “Los cristianos a través del prisma del islam: terminología e ideología en los textos árabo-islámicos de al-Andalus”, (Christians through the prism of Islam: terminology and ideology in the Arabic-Islamic texts of al-Andalus) Orientalismo, exotismo y traducción, Cuenca, 2000,  “La historiografía árabo-islámica clásica y sus traducciones” (Classical Arabic-Islamic historiography and its translations), in Traducir del árabe, coord. Míkel de Epalza, Gedisa, Barcelona, 2004,  “´Uluy, rum, muzaraves y mozárabes: imágenes encontradas de los cristianos de al-Andalus” (Uluy, rum, muzaraves and Mozarabs: different images of Christians in al-Andalus, Collectanea Cristiana Orientalia (CCO), nº 3, Córdoba, 2006,  “Christian participation in almohad armies and personal guards”, Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, vol. 2, 2010 and  “Piratería y cautividad desde el ámbito islámico. Ideología y diplomacia” (Piracy and captivity from the Islamic sphere. Ideology and diplomacy),  Ehumanista/IVITRA, 4, 2013. In 2010 she organised a congress at Alicante University about “Reinterpretaciones femeninas y feministas del islam de hoy” (Feminine and feminist reinterpretations of Islam today), and she coordinated issue 26 of Feminismo/s, entitled “Feminismos en las sociedades árabes” (Feminisms in Arabic societies), December 2015. 


    Abstract

    Al-Andalus is a landmark in the history of Islamo-Christian relations in the Middle Ages. As a far-away territory and border area with the classical or pre-modern Arabic-Islamic world, it holds a special place in the collective imagination of Muslims (for whom it is ‘paradise lost’) and also in the history of Spain, as a place where Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived side by side.

    Beyond Al-Andalus, we should be talking about the whole of the Iberian Peninsula as a unique phenomenon since, over the course of eight centuries, two combinations of societies came about: Muslim state with Christian and Jewish (dhimmis) minorities, and then a Christian state with Muslim (Mudejar) and Jewish minorities. In turn, complex and rich interfaith and multicultural relations were also seen in other areas of life: commerce, slavery, festivities, courts, life among neighbours, languages, and culture. The different data we have thanks to historical, literary, archaeological and legal sources – among others – reflect complex societies with moments of peaceful coexistence alongside others of tension and armed conflict.

    In this paper, we examine whether this model of coexistence – already a cliché within the Mediterranean collective imagination we might say – is valid (or to what extent) today for our complex multicultural societies and their future challenges, or whether, on the contrary, it is time to play down its value and situate it within its mediaeval pre-modern context, with all this entails. Hence, we will present the cultural and legal bases for interfaith co-existence on the Iberian Peninsula before analysing a series of moments and episodes within this co-existence that will allow us to rethink the real possibility that it might provide a practical example of how to resolve the conflicts of our postmodern societies.

  • Biography

    Vassilis Saroglou, with degrees in religious studies, philosophy, and psychology, is professor of psychology at the Université catholique de Louvain, where he directs the Centre for psychology of religion. His research and teaching experience is focused on the psychology of religion, including spirituality, fundamentalism, and atheism, and extends to personality, social, cultural, and moral psychology. He has also been visiting scholar or professor at College of William and Mary, Arizona State University, New York University, and Catholic University of Lille; and has served as president of the International Association for the Psychology of Religion and as co-editor of the International Journal of the Psychology of Religion. For his scientific work (120 publications) he has received numerous scientific distinctions, including, most recently, the 2017 William James Award of the APA-American Psychological Association-Division 36.


    Abstract

    Muslim Turks, Greek Orthodox, Italian Catholics, Israeli Jews, Protestant Irish … the links between religious and ethnic and national identities are complex. The two may fully overlap, be distinct but inter-related, or be in opposition; and they may have unidirectional or reciprocal influences. What are the underling psychological mechanisms explaining such complex links between these identities? Is it the religious, the ethnic, or the national identity that has a kind of priority--chronological, developmental, current psychological--in people’s lives? What is the role of religion in shaping--positively or negatively--immigrants’ and ethnic and religious minorities’ integration into a majority/host national culture? 

  • Biography

    Marco Ventura ha conseguito un dottorato in diritto e religione presso la Facoltà di Teologia cattolica dell’Università di Strasburgo nel 1992. Dal 2002 è professore ordinario di diritto canonico e diritto ecclesiastico presso il Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza dell’Università di Siena.  

    Per il triennio 2016-2018 è direttore del Centro per le Scienze religiose della Fondazione Bruno Kessler di Trento. Per il medesimo triennio è membro del Panel di esperti sulla libertà religiosa dell’Organizzazione per la Sicurezza e la Cooperazione in Europa (OSCE/ODIHR).  

    E’ ricercatore associato del centro Droit, Religion, Entreprise et Societé (DRES) dell’Università di Strasburgo e del CNR francese (CNRS). E’ membro dell’European Consortium for Church and State Research. E’ membro di vari comitati scientifici e editoriali, tra cui l’Editorial Board dell’Ecclesiastical Law Journal (Cambridge University Press).  

    I suoi interessi di ricerca includono il diritto ecclesiastico e il diritto canonico, le relazioni tra stati, chiese e gruppi religiosi, il diritto delle religioni, la libertà religiosa e la laicità, il diritto comparato delle religioni, la bioetica e il biodiritto.  

    Ha trascorso periodi d’insegnamento e di ricerca presso le università di Londra (UCL) nel 2002, di Oxford nel 2004, di Strasburgo nel 2005 e nel 2014-2015, presso il Centro de Formação Jurídica e Judiciária di Macao (Cina) nel 2006, presso l’Université libre de Bruxelles nel 2007, l’Indian Law Institute in Delhi nel 2011, l’ University of Cape Town nel 2011, l’University of California, Berkeley nel 2011 e 2013, l’Al-Akhawayn University di Ifrane (Morocco) nel 2014, l’International Center for Law and Religion Studies presso la Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah) nel 2015 e l’Università di Guelma (Algeria) nel 2016. Nel 2015 ha insegnato nel Summer training program on religion and the rule of law presso l’Università di Pechino (Constitutional and Administrative Law Center). Dall’ottobre 2012 al settembre 2015 è stato in congedo dall’Università di Siena ed è stato professore (hoogleraar) presso la Facoltà di diritto canonico dell’Università cattolica di Lovanio (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven) dove ha diretto il Master in Society, Law and Religion. Dal 2013 al 2015 è stato in Vietnam come esperto nel dialogo strategico tra Unione europea e governo vietnamita. E’ intervenuto al G20 interfaith di Istanbul (2015) e Pechino (2016).

    I suoi ultimi libri sono Creduli e credenti. Il declino di Stato e Chiesa come questione di fede (Torino: Einaudi, 2014), e From Your Gods to Our Gods. A History of Religion in British, Indian and South African Courts (Eugene OR: Cascade Books, 2014).


    Abstract

    Sono davvero universali i diritti umani? Sono davvero condivisibili da tutti gli uomini indipendentemente dalla cultura e dalla religione? Sono domande sempre più importanti nel tempo della globalizzazione. E’ infatti marcata la divisione tra popoli, comunità religiose e individui circa il catalogo dei diritti umani (si pensi al diritto all’omosessualità), il rapporto tra diritti individuali e diritti collettivi, il potere dei governi e delle autorità religiose di limitare le libertà, il ruolo degli stati e delle organizzazioni internazionali, delle comunità religiose e della società civile nella protezione dei diritti umani. In questo workshop individueremo gli assi del dibattito – le questioni di sostanza, le tendenze, la dimensione geo-politica, le strategie e gli strumenti – e ci interrogheremo sulle risorse culturali, politiche e giuridiche in una prospettiva interculturale. In considerazione dell’esperienza di Marco Ventura sul dialogo interreligioso nell’ambito dell’Organizzazione per la Sicurezza e la Cooperazione in Europa, particolare attenzione verrà riservata ai diritti umani nel dialogo tra credenti e tra credenti e non credenti e alla libertà religiosa. Per questi ambiti problematici, i partecipanti possono prepararsi al workshop attraverso la lettura di M. Ventura, “Dio è tornato. Le guerre di religione aumentano. La libertà religiosa diminuisce”, in Corriere della Sera. La Lettura, 24 luglio 2016, p. 9.

    QUI un testo introduttivo consigliato dal Prof. Ventura

  • Biography

    Alberto Fornasari, (PhD), Professore Aggregato di Pedagogia Sperimentale presso il Dipartimento di Scienze della Formazione, Psicologia, Comunicazione dell'Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Esperto in Processi Multi e Interculturali, Coordinatore del Laboratorio di Pedagogia Interculturale (UNIBA), Coordinatore del Gruppo di Ricerca Universitario "Religioniindialogo", Delegato del Magnifico Rettore per la Banca del Tempo, si occupa da svariati anni di ricerche nel settore interculturale con particolare attenzione alla dimensione del dialogo interreligioso. L'ultima sua ricerca promossa dalla Sezione Multiculturale della Biblioteca del Consiglio Regionale Pugliese  intitolata "I nomi di Dio" ha teso rilevare la percezione che gli adolecenti pugliesi hanno del rapporto tra religioni e culture. Tra le ultime pubblicazioni sul tema: THE ROLE OF RELIGIONS IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF IDENTITY PROCESSES IN A GLOBALIZED SOCIETY. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE SCHOOLS OF PUGLIA, Proceeding of international congress (ICMHM 16), Faculdade de Ciencias Sociais e Humanas / Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 7-9 Giugno 2016; e Il dialogo interreligioso: una sfida ai fondamentalismi.


    Abstract

    Il trinomio “colpa – etica - espiazione” attraversa, seppure con accenti diversi, tutte le tradizioni religiose, grandi e piccole, antiche e moderne.

    Le religioni abramitiche fondano le metanarrazioni sulla rottura di un patto (colpa), sul lungo processo di espiazione fondato su un nuovo ethos, fino alla ricomposizione della rottura (la sconfitta del diavolo, dal greco dia ballo,”separare”).Questo tema, paradossalmente diviene luogo simbolico di acceso confronto culturale (quando non armato), poiché se ogni tradizione religiosa vive perché riconosce una colpa originaria che deve essere espiata mediante procedure definite (teologicamente fondate e socialmente accettate), ciascuna fede ha la “propria colpa”, la “propria etica” e la “propria modalità di espiazione”, che sono percepite come fisiologiche: l’altrui colpa è invece vissuta come una sorta di “patologia” sul piano teologico, culturale e sociale. Su questa base si attivano i meccanismi di costruzione dell’identità collettiva e degli universi simbolici, attraverso diversi processi, primo tra i quali la celebrazione di riti, che hanno la fondamentale funzione di mettere a fuoco l’insieme dei valori e di diffonderlo attraverso i suoi membri i quali più partecipano più si convincono della loro scelta come giusta. Quest'ultimo effetto è di tale pregnanza che permane, seppur indebolito, anche in assenza di una successiva, ulteriore partecipazione continua. Questo processo triadico è parte della lezione berger-luckmaniana (1966) ed è costitutivo dell’impianto valoriale che presiede all’agire sociale, facendo leva su una concezione del mondo oggettivata e storicizzata, e perciò dotata di un carattere religioso dal quale non è facile prescindere.

    Si pone dunque come impellente la proposta della categoria di “relativismo culturale” come trasversale alle varie tradizioni religiose, come fondante quella “tolleranza” che l’epoca dei lumi ci ha consegnato.

  • Biography

    Adriano Favole è Vice direttore per la Ricerca del Dipartimento di Culture, Politica e Società dell'Università di Torino. Insegna Antropologia  culturale e Cultura e Potere. TRa i suoi libri: "La bussola dell'antropologo. Orientarsi in un mare di culture" (LAterza) e "Oceania. Isole di creatività culturale". Dal 2013 collabora con "La Lettura" del Corriere della Sera.


    Abstract

    I riti di passaggio in una prospettiva interculturale. A partire da alcuni esempi tratti da esperienze di ricerca in Oceania e nell'Oceano Indiano vorrei analizzare il tema della trasformazione dei riti di passaggio (nascita, età adulta, morte) in contesti caratterizzati da una lunga compresenza o convivenza di comunità religiose differenti.  Le periferie d'Europa in cui ho lavorato (Futuna e la Nuova Caledonia in Oceania, La Rèunion nell'Oceano Indiano) "sperimentano" da secoli situazioni di compresenza interreligiosa e possono oggi essere indagate quali laboratori di società pluriculturali. Nella parte finale dell'intervento mi chiederò: che ne è dei riti di passaggio nell'Occidente contemporaneo? E' vero che sono scomparsi? Se sì, con quali conseguenze sociali?

  • Biography

    Paolo Inghilleri, professore Ordinario di Psicologia Sociale, è Direttore del Dipartimento di Beni Culturali e Ambientali presso la Facoltà di Studi Umanistici dell’Università degli Studi di Milano. Laureato a pieni voti e con lode in Medicina e Chirurgia (1978), nel 1982 si è specializzato in Psicologia (indirizzo medico) presso l‘Università degli Studi di Milano.

    E’ stato più volte visiting scholar presso il Dipartimento di Scienze del Comportamento, Committee on Human Development, dell’Universita’ di Chicago e presso il Positive Psychology Center dell'Università di Pennsylvania.

    E’ stato consulente scientifico e responsabile di Progetti per la cooperazione con i paesi in via di sviluppo (Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano e ONG) nel campo della medicina, psicologia, psichiatria e sviluppo comunitario: Navajo Reservation (USA) 1981-83; Thailandia 1985; Nicaragua 1986-89; 1991-92, Somalia 1995-97.

    Membro di diverse associazioni scientifiche internazionali (APA, IACCP, Positive Psychology Center University of Pennsylvania), è membro del Comitato Scientifico del Corso di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Transculturale (riconosciuto dal MIUR come abilitante alla professione psicoterapeutica) della Fondazione Cecchini Pace di Milano.

    I suoi interessi di ricerca riguardano la relazione tra biologia, mente e cultura, lo studio dell’esperienza ottimale, la creatività, la psicologia culturale, la psichiatria transculturale, la psicologia ambientale.

    E’ autore di numerosi libri e di più di 100 articoli pubblicati su riviste italiane e internazionali.


    Abstract

    La psicologia culturale e l’etnopsicoanalisi sottolineano come in un mondo in trasformazione e caratterizzato da imponenti processi migratori la nostra identità deve basarsi su basi sicure, su garanzie psichiche e sociali ben strutturate. In questo senso, l’appartenenza religiosa, quale essa sia, può dare un così forte senso identitario, dal punto di vista psicologico ed esistenziale, dal rendere difficile, a livello profondo e dei processi decisionali, il porsi su posizioni "decentrate" e dialoganti. Discuteremo quindi il ruolo intrapsichico del confronto interreligioso e di come la pratica religiosa può essere fonte di conflitto e crisi nei rapporti interculturali o viceversa può diventare il motore di rapporti intersoggettivi dotati di senso e armonici tra persone di culture diverse.

  • Biography

    Valérie Amiraux is a full Professor of Sociology at the University of Montreal (on leave from her Senior Research Fellow position at the CNRS), where she holds the Canada Research Chair for the Study of Religious Pluralism. Her main fields are religious pluralism, the relationships between Muslim minorities and European and Quebecer societies, Islamophobia and discrimination. Her current research interests centre on an ethnographic analysis of the articulation between pluralism and radicalisation, with a special emphasis on the interaction between majority societies and Jews and Muslims as minorities in specific cities of Europe and Canada. Her most recent publications include:

    2017 

    AMIRAUX V., « From the Empire to the Republic: “French Islam”», in N. Bancel et al. (ed.), The Colonial Legacy in France, Indiana University Press (à paraître).

    2016

    AMIRAUX, V., « Visibility, Transparency and Gossip: How did the religion of some (Muslims) become the public concern of other? », Critical religious Studies (special issue: The Muslim Question), vol. 4(1), pp. 37-56.

    AMIRAUX V., « Parler des autres pour dire qui nous sommes : Débat(s) européen(s) sur le port du voile intégral », in D. Koussens, M.-P. Robert, C. Gélinas et al., La religion hors-la-loi : L'État libéral à l'épreuve des religions minoritaires, à paraître.

    AMIRAUX, V. et D. KOUSSENS (dir.), « Droit et religion en contexte de pluralisme : alliance objective ou mariage de raison ? //Law and Religion in Plural Societies : Objective Alliance or Marriage of Convenience ? », Studies in Religion-Religious Studies, 45 (2), numéro spécial.

    2015

    AMIRAUX, V. et F. DESHARNAIS, Salomé et les hommes en noir, Bayard Canada.

    2014

    AMIRAUX, V. et D. Koussens, Trajectoires de la neutralité, Presses de l’université de Montréal.


    Abstract

    The issue at stake in this workshop deals with the ways religion is being addressed in public in the context of liberal secular democracies. Taking religion seriously, we intend to discuss the possibilities for individuals to be simultaneously pious and citizens in such contexts.

    Looking at the variety of secular regimes in the European contexts, taking religious agencies seriously is an invitation to explore various avenues. It starts with understanding the meaning of religion as a category. For instance, we will examine the way political and judicial arenas have managed to make sense of religious performances by citizens (we’ll here focus on the particular situations of minority communities such as Sikhs, Jews or Muslims). How can the variety of religious gestures that composes religious pluralism in these contexts be addressed? It goes on with looking at the visibility of religion in these contexts and at the grammars that shape the public discussion around it (one think for instance of the mobilizations in different European contexts against same sex marriage). Is religion always a “hot topic”? Finally, the workshop will also adopt a theoretical gaze to think about the reformulation of the historical tie binding religion and politics in secular Europe in the current times.

Session 2 - Intercultural dialogue and religious dimention - 01-04-2017 - Morning

  • Biography

    Nato l'11 marzo 1959, è membro della Commissione per i diritti umani per la campagna globale contro la pena di morte, soprattutto in seguito al Congresso Internazionale dei Ministri della Giustizia nel 2008. E' responsabile del Segretariato del Meeting Internazionale di Dialogo Interreligioso, organizzato dal 1986 da Papa Giovanni Paolo II e il conseguente evento annuale organizzato dalla Comunità di Sant'Egidio. E' coinvolto soprattutto nei rapporti con il Patriarca della Chiesa etiopica. E' coinvolto nel mantenimento della pace e nella risoluzione dei conflitti come membro del Dipartimento di relazioni esterne / Strategia di pace di Sant'Egidio dal 1992. Ha collaborato alla pubblicazione di alcuni documenti editi da "Leonardo Internazionale"


  • Biography

    Paolo Naso insegna Scienza Politica e coordina il   Master in Religioni e mediazione culturale istituito presso la Sapienza Università di Roma. Coordina il Consiglio per le relazioni con l'Islam istituito presso il Ministero dell'Interno e siede nel comitato paritetico tra il Ministero dell'Istruzione Ricerca e Università (MIUR) e l'associazione Biblia  per la promozione della cultura biblica nelle scuole. E' anche membro del Direttivo della Sezione di Sociologia della Religione dell'Associazione italiana di sociologia (AIS). 

    Ha avuto incarichi di docenza presso l' Università di Catania, la Wake Forest University e il Davidson College, entrambi nel North Carolina, e la Pontificia Università Gregoriana (Istituto di Studi su Religione e Culture).

    Per la Federazione delle chiese evangeliche in Italia coordina il programma interculturale Essere chiesa insieme, la Commissione studi e il progetto Mediterranean Hope – Rifugiati e Migranti.

    Già direttore del mensile Confronti e della rubrica televisiva Protestantesimo (Raidue),  collabora le riviste Jesus e Limes; recentemente ha condotto il programma Uomini e Profeti (Radiorai3).

    Tra le sue opere più recenti: L'incognita post-secolare. Pluralismo religioso, fondamentalismi, laicità, Guida 2015; I ponti di Babele (con Brunetto Salvarani), EDB 2014; Pentecostali (EMI, Bologna 2013); Un cantiere senza progetto. L'Italia delle religioni-Rapporto 2012, (con Brunetto Salvarani), Emi 2012.


    Abstract

    Nella società post-secolare le religioni occupano un posto sempre più rilevante nello spazio pubblico.  I dati attestano però la scarsa attenzione dei mass media più popolari nei confronti dei fenomeni religiosi e spirituali del nostro tempo, con la  sola eccezione – soprattutto in Italia – relativa alle  cronache dal Vaticano  e, in particolare, dell’azione pastorale di papa Francesco. Al di là delle ovvie considerazioni storiche che l’hanno determinata, qual è il limite e il costo sociale di questa asimmetria? Quali sono  i temi, i luoghi e i personaggi oscurati dall’informazione religiosa italiana? Le cose vanno diversamente in altri contesti? I media aiutano a capire le religioni o, al contrario, contribuiscono a rafforzare stereotipi e pregiudizi sulle religioni? E in quale misura recepiscono e interpretano quel dialogo tra le religioni che cresce nel quadro di ogni società interculturale? Esistono esperienze in controtendenza? Perché i siti web di taglio “fondamentalista” sono assai più popolari di quelli orientati al dialogo e al confronto interreligioso?

    Il Workshop cercherà di rispondere a questi interrogativi fornendo dati ed esempi pratici sul ruolo dei media nei confronti del “nuovo pluralismo religioso” che attraversa tutte le società multietniche e multiculturali.

  • Biography

    E’ professore ordinario di Sociologia dei processi culturali all’Università di Torino, ove ha insegnato per molti anni “Religioni nel mondo globalizzato”. Nello stesso Ateneo ha ricoperto le cariche di Preside della Facoltà di Scienze politiche e  Direttore del Dipartimento ‘Culture, politica e società’.

    Si è formato a Torino alla scuola di Luciano Gallino e ha al suo attivo anche quattro anni di insegnamento alla Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell’Università di Napoli Federico II, prima di rientrare nell’Ateneo torinese.

    E’ membro ed è stato nel consiglio direttivo dell’International Society for the Sociology of Religion. Ha anche coordinato per alcuni anni la Sezione ‘Sociologia delle religioni’ dell’AIS, associazione dei sociologi italiani.

    Ho promosso e ha preso parte a numerose  indagini – a livello nazionale e internazionale – sugli stili di vita e sui modelli di comportamento dei giovani, sull’associazionismo, sul fenomeno religioso nella modernità avanzata.

    E’ editorialista dei quotidiani La Stampa e Il Messaggero.

    Tra le sue ultime pubblicazioni a livello nazionale: Religione all’italiana. L’anima del paese messa a nudo (il Mulino 2011); Famiglie (Dehoniane 2015);  Cattolici, Chiesa e politica. Dentro e oltre le emergenze (Cittadella 2016); Sociology of Atheism (edited with R. Cipriani), Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion (Brill, 6/2016); Piccoli atei crescono. Davvero una generazione senza Dio? (Il Mulino 2016). 


    Abstract

    Si cercherà nel seminario di meglio comprendere e definire la categoria del sacro e di valutare se essa può essere un terreno di confronto/dialogo tra credenti e non credenti, oppure se emergono su questi temi posizioni distintive e divergenti. La riflessione comune, rispettosa dei diversi orientamenti, potrà delinearsi su interrogativi come i seguenti:

    che idea hanno del ‘sacro’ i credenti e i non credenti?
    il ‘sacro’ è soltanto una categoria di quanti credono in Dio o hanno una concezione religiosa della vita,  oppure anche i non credenti  ammettono la presenza di una qualche forma di ‘sacro’?
    una vita senza sacro e senza Dio è una vita che manca di qualcosa o che esprime una diversa ricerca di senso?
    come si risponde alle grandi domande della vita riconoscendo di avere una ‘sacra volta’ sopra di sé, o ritenendo di non avere bisogno di Dio e del sacro per condurre un’esistenza sensata ed eticamente apprezzabile?
    vi può essere un ‘sacro’ secolare e un ‘sacro’ religioso?
    la spiritualità può essere una sorta di “zona intermedia” tra i non credenti e i credenti, tra quanti negano Dio o sono indifferenti alla religione e quanti invece si riconoscono in una realtà trascendente?

  • Biography

    Abdullahi El-Tom, Ph.D. teaches anthropology, Maynooth University, Ireland. His most recent books include:

    The Magic Potion (Children Story from Africa). Jasmaya Publications, USA, 2017
    The Magic Gourd (Children Story from Africa). Jasmay Publications, USA, 2017
    Mama’s Cow (African children story), Jasmaya Publications, USA, 2017
    Ethnographies of breastfeeding: Cultural contexts and confrontation. Edited by Tanya Cassidy and Abdullahi El-Tom. Bloomsbury, USA, 2016.
    Growing up in Darfur, Sudan. Second Edition. Jasmaya Production and Publications, USA, 2015
    The Crooked Merchant of Khartoum. Jasmaya Production and Publications, USA, 2015
    Zaghawa aptitude for commerce: Biography of Bushara Suleiman Nour. Red Sea Press. Trenton, USA, 2014.
    Study war no more: Military tactics of a Sudanese rebel movement. The Red Sea Press, Trenton, USA, 2013.
    Darfur, JEM and the Khalil Ibrahim Story. Second Edition of Arabic version. Translated by A. M. Adam. Roueya Publishing Company, 2013.


    Abstract

    In conventional wisdom, religion heads the list of taboo topics, particularly when we meet a new associate. Experts in the fields of communication, marketing, business, dating and diplomacy advise us to avoid religion at early encounters. Their list of taboo topics extends to include sport, health, family problems, sexuality, education and income. Intercultural dialogue fosters appreciation of different cultures, including regions. Branding religion a taboo topic forces us to rely on stereotypes and prejudices; a poor recipe for mutual understanding. The workshop consists of a short talk delivered by the facilitator to be followed by discussion.

  • Biography

    Giuseppe Giordan insegna Sociologia delle religioni all’Università di Padova dove coordina il dottorato internazionale su “Human Rights, Society, and Multi-level governance”. Cura con Luigi Berzano e Enzo Pace l’Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion ed è stato General Secretary dell’International Society for the Sociology of Religion. I temi sui quali sta lavorando sono la spiritualità nell’epoca postsecolare, la presenza delle chiese Ortodosse in Italia, e il rapporto tra le religioni e diritti umani.


    Abstract

    Il rapporto con il sacro nell’età contemporanea, lungi dall’affievolirsi o scomparire, si sta trasformando e ridefinendo secondo traiettorie impreviste. Se nel mondo tradizionale il modello strutturato della religione regolava la relazione tra l’identità e il sacro secondo una prospettiva gerarchica che richiedeva obbedienza e adeguamento, nell’epoca post-secolare il soggetto credente si rapporta al sacro a partire dalla propria libertà di scelta, facendo spazio nella propria esperienza di credere non solo ai sentimenti, al corpo e al benessere personale, ma anche a esperienze provenienti da altre tradizioni religiose. Quest’ultimo modello, che definiamo della “spiritualità”, riscrive  i confini tra le identità e le religioni, aprendo spazi di comunicazione e interazione che possono essere un antidoto alle derive violente e fondamentaliste.

  • Biography

    M. Christian Green is a scholar, teacher, researcher, and writer working in the fields of law, religion, ethics, human rights, and world affairs. She holds degrees from Georgetown University in history and government, Emory University in law and theology, and the University of Chicago in religion and ethics. She has taught at DePaul University, Harvard Divinity School, and the Candler School of Theology. She has been a researcher at the Religion, Culture, and Family Project at the University of Chicago, the Park Ridge Center for the Study of Health, Faith, and Ethics in Chicago, and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. She is currently a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University, an editor of the Journal of Law and Religion, and editor and publications manager for the African Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ACLARS).


    Abstract

    Love and friendship are key ways in which human beings relate to each other and to the sacred. How have love and friendship been understood in the West and in other cultures? How are love and friendship complicated by factors such as gender and religious or cultural difference? How do forces of fear and loneliness cut us off from each other and from the sacred? How do love and friendship exemplify key dynamics of mystery, otherness, and recognition as we week to know the divine and each other and live together in society? How do modern technologies of communication and social media connect or divide us from love and friendship from each other and from what is sacred, just, and good? These and other questions will be examined in this session through the fields of philosophy, theology, ethics, and social psychology as we seek to understand the meaning and power of love and friendship today.

Session 3 - Education for dialogue - 01-04-2017 - Afternoon

  • Biography

    Jeroen Temperman is associate professor of public international law at Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is also the editor-in- chief of Religion & Human Rights. The OSCE has appointed him as a member of the Panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion or Belief. His research is focused on freedom of religion or belief, the right to education, freedom of expression and extreme speech, religion–state relationships, and equality. His book Religious Hatred and International Law is published by Cambridge University Press, as part of the Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law (prefaced by Heiner Bielefeldt, UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief). Among other books, he has authored State–Religion Relationships and Human Rights Law (2010) and edited The Lautsi Papers: Multidisciplinary Reflections on Religious Symbols in the Public School Classroom (2012). Key publications further include articles published in Human Rights Quarterly, Oxford Journal on Law and Religion, Netherlands Quarterly on Human Rights, and Annuaire Droit et Religion. In 2014 he was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, facilitating a visiting professorship at American University Washington College of Law.


    Abstract

    State duties in the area of education consist of obligations to refrain from interferences but also, importantly, of obligations to proactively guarantee availability and access. Negative state obligations in the present context are clear and hardly disputed: public school education, it goes without saying, should be open to all children regardless of religious affiliation. The state may not interfere with someone’s right to education by barring this person from public school education on account of his or her (parents’) religion. Also, in terms of negative state obligations, the state must respect the right of parents not to avail of the schools established by the public authorities and their right to (establish or) opt for private educational institutions ––i.e. denominational schools–– so as to ensure the religious and moral education of their children in conformity with their own convictions. Turning to positive obligations, if the state is to respect every child’s right to education, it must at the very least make available free primary education to all. Although on the face of a self-evident notion, state practice shows that implementation of this norm leaves a lot to be desired.

    It is argued in this paper that the international standards on the right to education imply that the state is under a positive obligation to ensure that sufficient public schools with appropriate curricula are available at all times. A number of states, for different reasons, fail to properly implement this norm. This paper addresses the main failures and objectionable policies that can be discerned in the field of public school education that affect the rights of religious and non-religious minorities, including the following state practice:

    • Religious education is made compulsory for children;
    • The state has ‘contracted out’ the issue of education to religious institutions, thus not actively making available sufficient adequate ––in terms of international obligations–– education;
    • The state fails to frame a supposedly neutral subject on religion truly in a non-confessional manner;  
    • The state practices defective opt-out policies;
    • The state tolerates traditional forms of religious symbolism, affecting the compulsory non-confessional character of state schools; or:
    • The state de facto bars access to public school education by virtue of other policies, for instance regulations on dress codes.

    This paper is intended to assess relevant state practice so as to identify contemporary obstacles to access to adequate public school education with a particular focus on the rights of religious and non-religious minorities. The principal objective of this paper is to formulate recommendations, informed by the emerging notion of state neutrality in public school education, to overcome such obstacles. This paper will, at the same time, scrutinize the rationale and justification of the emerging norm of state neutrality.

  • Biography

    Alessandro Saggioro è Professore di Storia delle Religioni alla Sapienza di Roma. Nello stesso ateneo è direttore del Master in Religioni e mediazione culturale e del Dottorato in Storia dell'Europa. Ha al suo attivo numerose pubblicazioni sul tema delle religioni a scuola, fra cui: La materia invisibile. La storia delle religioni a scuola (con M. Giorda), Bologna, Emi, 2011; I princìpi di Toledo e le religioni a scuola. Traduzione, presentazione e discussione dei Principi di Toledo sull’insegnamento sulle religioni e le credenze nelle scuole pubbliche – ODHIR-OSCE, (con A. Bernardo - curatela), Aracne, Roma, 2016.


    Abstract

    Nell'Italia contemporanea sono sempre più evidenti due tendenze: da una parte si registra un sempre maggiore interesse per tutto ciò che è religione e religioso; dall'altra gli osservatori individuano nell'analfabetismo religioso una costante sempre più diffusa.

    A partire da una riflessione sulla presenza/assenza dello studio delle religioni al plurale nella scuola italiana, con un'attenzione alle prospettive europee, questo panel ha l'obiettivo di mettere in evidenza, conoscere e far conoscere esperimenti di dialogo interreligioso a scuola, interazioni fra il mondo della scuola e le religioni del territorio, progettualità innovative. 

    Il panel ha l'obiettivo di raccogliere studenti (o ex-studenti), insegnanti e operatori della scuola che possano portare il contributo della propria esperienza e lavorare in un'ottica di condivisione delle buone prassi.

  • Biography

    Christopher Muscat ha frequentato il St. Aloysius College di Malta e ha studiato teologia presso la Facoltà di Teologia del Nord Italia. Insegna religione all'IIS "8 Marzo" di Settimo Torinese ed è insegnante guida all'interno di "Rete Dialoghi", per la quale coordina le videoconferenze di "Generation global". Dirige anche un progetto della Fondazione Tony Blair. Facilita le videoconferenze quando studenti provenienti da diversi paesi si incontrano per costruire un dialogo interculturale e interreligioso.


    Abstract

    Con Generation Global[1] aiutiamo giovani provenienti da diversi paesi a mettersi in contatto tra di loro e a dialogare. Gli studenti di età compresa tra i 12-14 e i 15-17 anni, sono invitati a costruire un dialogo con i loro coetanei di altri Paesi, condividendo le loro idee e prospettive. Possono parlare di diversi argomenti: valori, identità, ambiente, ricchezza e povertà, espressioni di odio e diritti umani. Moduli didattici adeguati, a partire da "Elementi essenziali di dialogo" sono insegnati agli studenti prima di incontrare i loro nuovi amici di cultura, religione, lingua diversa.

    Gli studenti possono scrivere blog o partecipare a videoconferenze, che sono dirette da educatori qualificati che conducono gli studenti nei loro dialoghi e danno grande importanza al rispetto reciproco e all'empatia.
    Le attività di Generation Global mirano a prevenire estremismi attraverso l'istruzione e il dialogo. Sono uno spazio sicuro dove gli studenti sono in grado di parlare liberamente e condividere le loro opinioni, idee e convinzioni. Agli studenti viene insegnato a fidarsi l'uno dell'altro, a non giudicare e ad essere inclusivi.
    Generation Global fornisce supporto pratico per contribuire a promuovere un dialogo efficace, empatia e comprensione. Non solo queste competenze saranno utili agli studenti mel lavoro e nella vita al di là della scuola, ma permettono loro di affrontare con successo le conversazioni difficili e le differenze che si incontrano in un mondo multiculturale.
    Con la piattaforma e il curriculum di Generation Global, gli studenti entrano in contatto con loro coetanei provenienti da tutto il mondo e sono in grado di insegnare e imparare da culture diverse. Generation Global fornisce agli educatori gli strumenti necessari per effettuare questi collegamenti, tra cui aule virtuali e ambienti online sicuri e controllati. Questo processo permette agli studenti di acquisire le competenze e l'esperienza di cui hanno bisogno per affrontare la diversità in modo pacifico.


    [1]Generation Global è un progetto della “Tony Blair Faith Foundation”  TBFF

  • Biography

    I am currently Chair of the Standing Advisory Council for Religious Education (SACRE) in Bradford. This body is responsible for Religious Education and Collective Worship in community schools throughout Bradford District.

    I was a secondary school teacher for 20 years in multicultural and multifaith communities. I have also held high level School Improvement posts in three local authorities and my specialist roles have included equalities, community cohesion and teaching of English to speakers of other languages. From 1997 to 2013, I was a regular contributor to and associate editor of Race Equality Teaching, a UK-based journal with an international readership.

    I hold a degree in English and American Literature from Warwick University and a Master’s degree in Urban Education from King’s College, London.

    I live in Saltaire, a World Heritage site within Bradford District and I am Chair of the Board which runs the annual arts festival in that area. 


    Abstract

    Religious education in England and Wales is currently the subject of much philosophical and political debate. Bradford is a diverse educational district with representation of all six major world faiths and other world views and religion is high profile across communities. In this context, Bradford SACRE completely re-wrote its syllabus for Religious Education over the academic year 2015-16 and this is now being used in schools.  I will explain the Bradford context and discuss the national and local challenges for Bradford in deriving the syllabus and in agreeing its emphasis with religious communities.

  • Biography

    Dr. Ekaterina Teryukova is currently an Associate Professor for Religious Studies at the Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, and the Deputy-Director for Research Affairs in the State Museum of the History of Religion, Saint-Petersburg, Russia. Born in Saint-Petersburg, Dr. Teryukova was graduated in the Chair of the History of Art at the Saint-Petersburg State University. Gained her Dh.D. (Philosophy) in  2001 in the same University.


    Abstract

    Religious artifacts being in a temple or sanctuary are included in a specific religious context, which has anthropological, cultural, historical and psychological elements. Its meaning is revealed only in the unity of the components associated with the peculiarities of beliefs and practices of a religion. In transferring these artifacts into museum space, the semantic and axiological reorientation of senses and meanings, which are associated with them, appears. The sacred object represented in secular museum sphere, thus gives the opportunity to see it from different perspective. The museum as a public neutral place, where people of every background and identity may meet, gives the floor to discuss religion. Presenting religious artifacts, some museums offer the visitors not only a possibility to see the variety of the cultural heritage of world religions, but also to make step forward into the understanding of the role of religion in history and modern situation. It is important for the museum visitors, especially for school-children and students not only to contemplate, but also to get some new knowledge, experience and skills.

  • Biography

    Jo Malone is the Senior Project Manager for education at the Tony Blair Faith Foundation where she has responsibility for projects and elements of programmes related to dialogue and education. She joined the Faith Foundation at the inception of the Generation Global programme (then known as Face to Faith) and has played a lead role in its development, especially in curriculum development, teacher and facilitator training, videoconference dialogue and expansion of the programme in Europe. Prior to joining the Foundation, she was for 14 years, a class teacher and a curriculum and pastoral manager in various state secondary schools in England as well as working as a consultant for safeguarding projects and for examination boards.


    Abstract

    In this session Jo will draw on the seven years’ experience of the Generation Global programme in connecting tens of thousands of young people across six continents for dialogue about their lives, faiths, cultures and beliefs in facilitated video conferencing and online blogging. She will draw on both what has been hugely successful as well as the key lessons learned in the development of this programme.

    Jo will share her guidance for facilitating dialogue between people of different cultures, faiths and beliefs, including how to create safe spaces, how to identify and assess dialogue, and how to seek challenge and ‘successful disagreement’.

    For more about the Generation Global programme please visit:  http://generation.global

Conclusions - 02-04-2017 - Morning

  • Biography

    Former Ambassador to India, after being for five years (2003-2008) Ambassador to Iran. Until 2003, he was Head of Policy Planning at the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and chaired  the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Development Assistance Committee network on conflict, peace, and development co-operation. As a career diplomat, he has served in a number of other posts (Chile, USSR, Spain, United States, as well as at Italy’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations at Geneva). He holds a degree in law from the University of Parma and an M.A. from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, which he attended as a Fulbright fellow. In 1987-88 he was a Fellow at the Center for International Affairs of Harvard University. From 2000 to 2003, he was a visiting professor of international relations in the Department of Political Science at LUISS University in Rome. He is the author of books and articles (on human rights, peacekeeping, conflict prevention, ethics and international relations) published in Italy, the U.S., France, Spain and India.